About Synéastes Films

Synéastes Films was created in 2010 by filmmakers Rana Kazkaz and Anas Khalaf.  With a focus on films from the Middle East, they have created international co-productions with countries such as France, Belgium, Switzerland, Jordan, Syria, Qatar, Australia and the U.S.


They have produced four short films : Mare Nostrum, Ham, Deaf Day and Searching for the Translator and one feature film The Translator. They currently have several short and feature films in development.

Their work has been recognized and supported by Crossroads Thessaloniki, the Mediterranean Film Institute, Abu Dhabi Shasha, Melbourne’s Co-Production Market, Europe's MEDIA fund, Interchange, Med Film Factory, the British Council, Arte, France Televisions, the French CNC, the Prince Claus Fund and the European Union, Meetings on the Bridge, The Atelier de la Cinéfondation Cannes.

 

FILMS

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Deaf Day 

2011

In Damascus, Syria, a Mother prepares her Deaf son to leave their home and venture outside in order to learn how to live in a hearing world. However, it is the Son who ends up teaching his Mother the value of silence.

Searching For The Translator

2015

During an acting workshop, Syrian refugees are given a safe space to explore their feelings of fear and courage.

Mare Nostrum

2016

On the shore of the Mediterranean Sea, a Syrian Father makes a decision that puts his daughter’s life at risk.

The Translator

2020

March 2011. As the Syrian Revolution begins, a political refugee illegally returns to Syria and risks everything to free his brother from the Assad regime.

 

Upcoming Films

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Love-45

An overweight Lebanese man, traumatized by a rocket attack that killed his parents and dreams, is inspired to heal when he meets a Syrian tennis prodigy.

Honest Politics

A woman is hired by a Syrian politician to teach him how to use the English language in order to create empathy for his government’s violent actions. Opposed to his views, she is nonetheless drawn to the permission to speak honestly with him.

The Hakawati’s Daughter

In 1960s Damascus, Shara’s gender prohibits her from inheriting the profession of storyteller, hakawati, from her father. Fifty years later, Shara is reminded of her struggle when she meets Zade, a little girl coming of age during the Syrian conflict.

 

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